Many books are just too superficial in my opinion. They do not feel “necessary” other than seemingly to fill a void in some person’s ego or desire to be noticed. A lot of photographers – and this is not limited by any means to the younger ones — seem to have a few interesting photos under their belt and then think they’ll make a book, so they just repeat themselves 47 more times and there you have it.
cuckoomagazine:

Jaejin Hwang is a freelance photographer from South Korea. This week we take a closer look at his series titled ‘Asleep’ and his background. 
Describe your style in 3 words.Natural, Surreal, SymbolicTell us about your project ‘Asleep’Asleep describes an ambiguous distinction between falling asleep andpeaceful death. This is inspired by the song, Asleep, by the Smiths.When I listened to that song, I realized thatthere are some common things between falling asleep and peacefuldeath. I expressed this feeling by snap shots in our daily lives.What’s your background, how did you get interested in photography?I am a grad student in Engineering. I got interested in photography in2009. I had a chance to use a film camera, and I was fascinated by ashutter sound, and I was attracted to see things by a viewfinder.I liked to show the people how I see the thins surrounding us.What do you find challenging about photography?I like to catch certain natural moments, so everything is alwaysunexpected. If I miss the moment, it is already gone. So I need to bevery sensitive to the surrounded things most time.Who’s your favourite living photographer?Ume kayo is my favorite Japanese photographer. She is really good attaking certain moments in our daily lives. Her photographs are verysimple, powerful, warm, and humorous.What camera did you use for this project?Most time I used Yashica T4 zoom and Olympus Mju ii. Those are veryhandy and focus things quickly.What does photography mean to you?It helps me to express things I sense. Photography is a great tool todeliver my feeling to people. And, most time it heals me.What place would you like to visit ?I’d like to go to the hot air balloon festival. I want to expressthose scene in my frame.What are you working on at the moment?I keep taking pictures, but I haven’t decided the theme. Most time, myprocess is continuously taking pictures to express my feelings, then Ilook back at my photos, and understand a big picture of my feeling, thenmake a theme.

cuckoomagazine:

Jaejin Hwang is a freelance photographer from South Korea. This week we take a closer look at his series titled ‘Asleep’ and his background. 

Describe your style in 3 words.

Natural, Surreal, Symbolic

Tell us about your project ‘Asleep’

Asleep describes an ambiguous distinction between falling asleep and
peaceful death. This is inspired by the song, Asleep, by the Smiths.
When I listened to that song, I realized that
there are some common things between falling asleep and peaceful
death. I expressed this feeling by snap shots in our daily lives.

What’s your background, how did you get interested in photography?

I am a grad student in Engineering. I got interested in photography in
2009. I had a chance to use a film camera, and I was fascinated by a
shutter sound, and I was attracted to see things by a viewfinder.
I liked to show the people how I see the thins surrounding us.

What do you find challenging about photography?

I like to catch certain natural moments, so everything is always
unexpected. If I miss the moment, it is already gone. So I need to be
very sensitive to the surrounded things most time.

Who’s your favourite living photographer?

Ume kayo is my favorite Japanese photographer. She is really good at
taking certain moments in our daily lives. Her photographs are very
simple, powerful, warm, and humorous.

What camera did you use for this project?

Most time I used Yashica T4 zoom and Olympus Mju ii. Those are very
handy and focus things quickly.

What does photography mean to you?

It helps me to express things I sense. Photography is a great tool to
deliver my feeling to people. And, most time it heals me.

What place would you like to visit ?

I’d like to go to the hot air balloon festival. I want to express
those scene in my frame.

What are you working on at the moment?

I keep taking pictures, but I haven’t decided the theme. Most time, my
process is continuously taking pictures to express my feelings, then I
look back at my photos, and understand a big picture of my feeling, then
make a theme.

(via jaejinhwang)

mpdrolet:

Bride in church basement, Granite City, Illinois, 1965
Charles Harbutt

mpdrolet:

Bride in church basement, Granite City, Illinois, 1965

Charles Harbutt

Everyone’s chest
is a living room wall
with awkwardly placed photographs
hiding fist-shaped holes.
— Andrea Gibson, “Class” (via hiefa)

(Source: millionen, via crocket)

tokyo-camera-style:

Seen: Araki Nobuyoshi’s Kirishinat Rathole Gallery in Aoyama

Back in 2011 I was asked by Marc Feustel of Eyecurious to provide some Japanese photobooks for an article entitled  Photobooks 2011: a view from Japan in it, I listed two books by Araki which dealt with his physical alteration of negatives and prints used to make the work, Shakyou-ronin Nikki (Wides), and Shamanatsu 2011 (Rathole). 

In May of 2014 Taka Ishii Gallery exhibited a series of new work titled Love On The Left Eye (mini report here) Araki blackened out the right half of each slide film frame with a marker directly as a sort of darkly playful artistic response to going blind in his right eye. Kirishin continues his creative destruction and rebirth-through picture-halves, this time with a pair of scissors and cellophane tape. The technical explanation is easy- Two frames of slide film were held together and then sliced through. Each part of the frame was paired with its opposite and taped together to create two new pictures which were then scanned and enlarged for the exhibition. The press release from Rathole explains:

Kirishin, when written in Japanese as 切真 is composed of the character kiru meaning “to cut” (also used in the Japanese word for “sentimental”- a key theme found in many of Araki’s works-) and the character meaning “the truth” (also used in the Japanese word shashin meaning photography). 

Careful viewers will notice some subtle yet clever formal connections between the image halves but to simply view them as those kinds of exercises would be missing the bigger picture- but Araki’s pictures have never been just about direct content, either. From the press release:

“Photography is just like life,” explains Araki, who gives birth to new discoveries and realities through a unique and unexpected synthesis of images in Kirishin. Not only is the title a clever play on words characteristic of the artist, but the photographs in the exhibition also express Araki’s playful sense of humor and his unrelenting thirst for life.

Kirishin is up at Rathole Gallery from September 26 – November 2, 2014  / 12:00 - 20:00 / Closed Mondays

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